Financial assistance

U.S. Colleges Switch to Distance Learning Despite Millions of Dollars Drawn from Coronavirus Aid Funding

Colleges and universities across America received millions of dollars in government funding over the coronavirus pandemic, some of which were intended to help them safely reopen their campuses to in-person learning.

However, many schools that have received government funding are now starting their spring 2022 semester with distance learning.

According to the Ministry of Education, $ 74.9 billion from the Higher Education Emergency Assistance Fund has been allocated to colleges and universities across the country.

When the CARES law was enacted in March 2020, it required institutions using money from the Higher Education Emergency Aid Fund to use 50% of the funds received for direct student financial aid grants. The remaining amount could be used for costs related to the coronavirus pandemic.

DURHAM, NC – JANUARY 27: A general view of the Duke University Chapel on the Duke University campus. ((Photo by Lance King / Getty Images) / Getty Images)

The US bailout added $ 39.6 billion to the Higher Education Emergency Aid Fund and obligatory that institutions accepting cash are required to “implement evidence-based practices to monitor and suppress the coronavirus in accordance with public health guidelines.”

Several universities that have accepted funding from the Higher Education Emergency Aid Fund are now looking to distance learning to start the spring semester 2022:

Yale University:

Courses at Yale University, for undergraduates and graduate students, courses will be held remotely from January 25 to February 4.

Yale University has received more than $ 5.2 million from the Higher Education Emergency Assistance Fund and, as of September 30, has spent around $ 3.8 million.

Duke University:

The administration of Duke University announcement Friday that they will extend the period during which students will attend distance learning courses. Students will attend distance learning courses from January 5-18.

Previously, students were required to resume classes in person on January 10, but this was extended until January 18.

duke university has received more than $ 26.8 million from the Higher Education Emergency Aid Fund and, as of September 30, has spent around $ 3.8 million.

Philadelphia, USA – May 4, 2015: Temple University building in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. (iStock) (iStock)

Temple University

Temple University announced on December 22 that the spring semester courses will be taught remotely until January 21. The university has also delayed the move-in date for undergraduates living on campus by two weeks. The move-in will now take place on January 22.

Temple University has received more than $ 151.2 million from the Higher Education Emergency Assistance Fund and, as of September 30, has spent around $ 100.9 million.

Washington University

Washington University announcement that most of the winter semester courses will be taught remotely during the first week.

the Washington University has received more than $ 205.9 million from the Higher Education Emergency Assistance Fund and, as of September 30, approximately $ 117.8 million has been spent.

Campus of Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee.

Vanderbilt University

Vanderbilt University announcement Thursday that the start of the spring semester is delayed. The semester will now begin on January 17th.

Vanderbilt University has received more than $ 28.4 million from the Higher Education Emergency Assistance Fund and, as of September 30, has spent around $ 24.3 million.

Miami University

President of the University of Miami Julio Frenk announcement Wednesday that the courses will be remote during the first two weeks of the semester.

The University of Miami was awarded more than $ 41.260 million from the Higher Education Emergency Aid Fund and, as of September 30, it had spent nearly $ 20 million.

Fox News’ Brooke Singman contributed to this report


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